Crazy French Ranch

  • Henry Field-image
  • Henry Field-image
  • Henry Field-image

Henry Field

Field Brokers logoField Brokers, LLC
1468 S St. Francis Drive
Santa Fe, NM 87505

Henry FieldTitle: Broker
Cell:
(505) 577-7367
Fax:
(888) 866-8557
Email:
Contact broker
Web:
www.field-brokers.com

Letter from the Broker

 
$79,000,000 USD

Crazy French Ranch is recognized as a jewel of southern Colorado, boasting approximately 40,000 acres of breathtaking landscape that includes grassy meadows, mountainsides of Ponderosa pine, fir and Aspen, rugged rock escarpments, steep ravines, and much of the top Fishers Peak, which at over 9,600 feet is the highest point in the U.S. from Trinidad east to the Atlantic Ocean.

With 4,000 feet of elevation change, Crazy French Ranch is one of the few ranches in the western United States with prime habitat that supports seven big game trophy animals on the same property—elk, mule deer, bison, black bear, pronghorn, cougar, and turkey. The original Santa Fe Trail wound through the property, which is also rich with Indian artifacts. According to local lore, Billy the Kid considered the ranch’s wild terrain a perfect hideout.

History of the Old West-image

History of the Old West

Legends such Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp, Pat Garrett and Kit Carson all spent time in Trinidad, Colorado.
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Gallery Photos-image

Gallery Photos

Browse the collection of Crazy French Ranch and its inhabitants.

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Interview with Evelyne Jung

I grew up in Strasbourg, France.  Like many Europeans, I was fascinated with the American West. We studied Indians and cowboys in school. Before that, when I was three I was given a cartoon book about an Indian girl, named Dalva, who lived in Santa Fe. It was my favorite book and I wanted to be Dalva! You might say that I did become Dalva!

When I first moved to Trinidad, I didn’t speak a word of English. The language barrier was challenging especially since the ranch had no road, no house, no nothing.  I bought a bulldozer and tried to hire a manager, which was funny, me trying to communicate with these tough cowboys.  They thought I was crazy! Trinidad is surprisingly international with Germans, Irish, Swiss, Italians. I met a French woman here and she taught me English.

I have a special connection with animals so every year for my birthday I was given a new pet. For my 40th birthday, I was gifted a herd of 80 buffalo, including Forty, the largest bull in the state. I used to love to walk among the herd and touch them gently. They let me do that.

I am quite a good shot but I have to say, hunting is not a passion of mine. It is a necessity. At the ranch, there is no disease and hunting is the way to manage the herds and protect the land from overgrazing. I am a vegetarian but will quarter the game for consumption. If I did eat meat, I would prefer to eat something I shot over anything purchased in a grocery store.

When we first bought the ranch there was no hunting and there were no licenses because there was no game. I rarely even saw an elk. That certainly changed. We joined the “Ranching for Wildlife” program sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife and offered 40 percent of our allotted licenses to the public through a lottery system. With the others, we held “safaris” and invited hunters, many of them from overseas, to stay here over the course of several days. We served French food, of course, all made with game from the ranch.

Trinidad is a good town. There are so many internationals who live or visit that the locals are welcoming towards foreigners. The gunsmith program at the college is world-renowned and also attracts students from all over.

Trinidad’s airport has a paved 5500-foot runway, and there is also an airport in Raton, N.M. You could easily build a bigger strip on the ranch. Access by helicopter is no problem. Santa Fe, N.M. is two-and-a-half hours by car.

The house is all windows, to let the outdoors in, and the views are amazing. It is by no means a castle because housing was never our priority. The animals were.

The ranch is a magical place and I am proud to have been its steward all these years. The blue skies are so vivid. The complexion changes with every season. In winter, the snow falls like thousands of glistening diamonds. In the spring, everything wakes up. In the summer, we rarely go inside. And the stars: there is no light to block their brilliance. The overlooks are breathtaking. The views from the top of Fishers Peak are panoramic.

 

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Letter from the Broker

Letter from the Broker,

I am excited to be able to offer this world-class property for sale. I work closely and diligently with my clients and with other real estate brokers to complete each sale. This ranch has a long history of successful North American large game safaris. People have come from all over the globe to hunt at the Crazy French Ranch. One of a few places where a hunter could hunt elk, deer, bison, black bear, puma, turkey, antelope, and coyote, all on the same ranch.

Crazy French Ranch is located in Las Animas County near Trinidad, Colorado off I-25 about midway between Colorado Springs and Santa Fe, New Mexico and is an assemblage of contiguous and noncontiguous parcels. Much of the property has direct access to Interstate 25 by way of three primary exits.  Perry Stokes Airport is located northeast of Trinidad and has a 5500 ft. long paved runway.

The Ranch ranges in elevation from about 5600 ft. to about 9600 ft. at the top of Fishers Peak. Fishers Peak is the highest peak between Trinidad, Colorado and the Atlantic Ocean within the Continental United States. The views on and from the ranch are truly breathtaking!

Trinidad experiences a semi-arid climate, with hot summers and cold winters. Summers days are hot, but due to Trinidad’s high elevation, summer nights are cool, and temperatures drop sharply after sunset. Winters are cold, but milder than in many mountain towns in Colorado. In the winter, daytime highs are usually above freezing, but temperatures below zero are possible, especially at night.  According to Sperling’s Best Places the area averages about 265 days of sunshine, 72 precipitation days, 14.5 inches of rainfall, and 27.5 inches of snowfall. US Climate data have the annual average high temperature at 67.1 degrees Fahrenheit.

I look forward to working with you!

Sincerely,

Henry Field

 

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Press Release

Crazy French Ranch, Internationally Acclaimed for a “Priority to Wildlife” and Conservation, Offered for Sale at US$79,000,000

Located in Southern Colorado, some 40,000 majestic acres—now blue ribbon habitat to elk, black bear, cougar and more—includes a rich legacy of the American West

Rare opportunity to own much of the summit of Fishers Peak, an iconic mesa soaring to over 9,600 feet and the highest U.S. elevation east to the Atlantic Ocean

bear_viewTrinidad, ColoradoLa joie de vive has imbued Crazy French Ranch under its current ownership of 25-years: John Wayne-inspired dreams, a passion for wildlife and land conservation, an Old West sense of adventure and history, right down to the name chosen.

“My husband was shopping in town,” says Evelyne Jung, “when a local approached him and said, ‘You must be the crazy Frenchman who bought that ranch.’ My husband thought it was perfect to officially name the ranch what the town was already calling it.”

Crazy French Ranch is recognized as a jewel of southern Colorado, boasting 4,000 feet of elevation change and a breathtaking landscape that includes grassy meadows, mountainsides of Ponderosa pine, fir and Aspen, rugged rock escarpments, steep ravines, and most of the top Fishers Peak, which at over 9,600 feet is the highest point in the U.S. from Trinidad east to the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the few ranches in the western United States with prime habitat that supports seven big game trophy animals on the same property—elk, mule deer, bison, black bear, pronghorn, cougar, and turkey. The original Santa Fe Trail wound through the property, which is also rich with Indian artifacts. According to local lore, Billy the Kid considered the ranch’s wild terrain a perfect hideout.

“This is the first time that the ranch is being offered for sale in its entirety, including the Raton East parcel with Fishers Peak,” says Henry Field of Field Brokers, LLC, located in Santa Fe, N.M. who is representing the property. “The owner’s hope is to find the next steward for this exceptional land with the vision and passion to carry on her commitment to land conservation and wildlife management. I saw four bears and
two large bull elk on my first trip to see the property and I wasn’t even looking for wildlife”.

elk_viewThe Crazy French Ranch’s conversion from overgrazed cattle pasture to verdant wildlife habitat began as a childhood dream; the Jungs both grew up in France watching John Wayne films, which were extremely popular in Europe at the time. The couple spent months looking at ranches for sale along the entire Rocky Mountain Range. On November 15, 1986, while driving with friends from Pueblo to Santa Fe, New Mexico, Evelyne Jung became smitten with the topography around Trinidad, pulled off I-25 when she saw a sign advertising land for sale and the Jungs contracted to purchase their original parcel of some 16,000 acres the next day.

Evelyne was expert in transforming the land for the benefit of the local wildlife. Cattle grazing was limited and the process of creating wildlife habitat began. Where once an elk sighting was rare, now large herds roam. For her 40th birthday, Evelyne received a shipment of 80 bison; now the herd is almost 150 strong.  The bison herd is included in the sale. They continued to amass acreage to support the wildlife, now totaling approximately 40,000 deeded acres in five parcels.

“The land is magical and diverse,” Evelyne says. “Where we have the buffalo reminds me of the plains of Africa. There are other desert climes that look like Morocco, which shouldn’t be surprising since Trinidad is on the same latitude. The mountains and the pine trees remind me of the South of France.”

Hunting was introduced to manage the herds and the predator populations. These were exclusive affairs with no more than six groups on the ranch at one time and each led by a guide, who specified which game was suitable to take. The best bear guide on the ranch was Evelyne herself, tracking up steep slopes and over miles of mountain trails. The hunts attracted an international clientele, including foreign dignitaries.

Evelyne’s husband passed away in 1997 and Evelyne says she can’t ride her horses or scramble up the peaks the way she once could. “It is time for the ranch’s next chapter,” she says.

All water and mineral rights owned by the Crazy French Ranch are being transferred with the property, which has no conservation easements attached to it. An international buyer for the ranch could try qualifying for the investor visa program, which grants a green card and a path to U.S. citizenship for investing and creating jobs in targeted employment areas.

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  • Trinidad and the Old West-image

Trinidad and the Old West

A large grove of cottonwood trees along the Purgatoire River was a favorite resting place for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail. Here they recovered from the difficult journey from Bent’s Fort and rested for the even more difficult trek over Raton Pass and into the New Mexico Territory. This spot is now near downtown Trinidad.

bobcat_view
The area was inhabited first by the Anasazi, the Jicarilla Apaches, and then the Spanish as part of Mexico.

In 1841, Kit Carson worked as a hunter for Bent's Fort, which was a privately owned trading post about 90 miles east of Trinidad. From 1846 to 1865, he scouted for the army and fought against Apaches, Navajo, Kiowas and Comanches during the Indian uprisings along the Santa Fe Trail. There is now a park in downtown Trinidad with a statue dedicated to Carson.

In March of 1882, Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday rode out of Tombstone, Arizona for the last time after killing the four men responsible for shooting Morgan Earp. In Silver City, New Mexico, they boarded a train to Albuquerque, where they were met by their good friend Bat Masterson, who was the sheriff of Trinidad. They stayed in Trinidad for several weeks and Earp dealt faro at Masterson’s saloon.

Outlaws found the rugged terrain outside of Trinidad to be the perfect place to hide out. One such outlaw was Billy the Kid. Local lore says that he lived in a cabin on what is now Crazy French Ranch and grew potatoes.

Billy the Kid’s brother, Joseph Antrim, lived in Trinidad. In August of 1882, a year after Pat Garrett killed Billy the Kid in Fort Sumner, N.M., Garrett met with Antrim in the lobby of Trinidad’s Armijo Hotel. After several hours of conversation, the two rose and shook hands. Both made short statements to the press that they had discussed the killing of Billy the Kid. Garrett and Antrim parted never to meet again.

elk_fight_snowIn January of 1915, Mother Jones, the feisty and fearless defender of mine workers, was seized by militia upon her arrival in Trinidad from El Paso, Texas. She was taken from the train and held for two hours until a train arrived from Denver. She was deported and told never to return. Jones had come to support striking coal miners.

In 1935, while visiting Trinidad, Will Rogers said, “Trinidad, Colorado, has enough coal to melt the North Pole until it runs.”

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Crazy French Ranch

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RATON PASS EAST: 37.063936, -104.489894
SANDOVAL/UPS: 37.061427, -104.372596
DIDERO SOUTH: 37.041476, -104.296989
PRAIRE HILL: 37.132095, -104.283192
DIDERO NORTH: 37.146669, -104.300594

Contact Me

Henry Field-image

Henry Field

Field Brokers logoTitle: Broker

Cell: (505) 577-7367

Fax: (888) 866-8557

Web: www.field-brokers.com

Letter from the Broker